CENSORSHIP OF PRESS ACT 1799


CENSORSHIP OF PRESS ACT 1799

Lord Wellesley enacted this act.

According to this Act-

Every newspaper should print the names of the printer, editor and proprietor.

Before printing any material it should be submitted to the secretary of Censorship.

These restrictions were relaxed under Lord Hastings.

 

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LICENSING REGULATIONS, 1823

The acting governor-general, John Adams enacted these.

According to this-

Every publisher should get a license from the government, defaulters would be fined Rs 400 and the press would be ceased by the government.

The government has the right to cancel the license.

These restrictions were directed chiefly against Indian language newspapers or those edited by Indians.

Raja Rammohan Roy’s  Mirat-ul-Akbar had to stop publication.

Charles Metcalf (Governor-General of India 1835-36) abolished the Act.

 

PRESS ACT OF 1835

In 1835 Sir Charles Metcalfe restored the freedom of the Press with the passing of the Press Law.

The new Press Act (1835) required a printer/publisher to give a precise account of premises of a publication and cease functioning if required by a similar declaration.

The result of a liberal press policy was the rapid growth of newspapers.

 

VERNACULAR PRESS ACT, 1878

The Act provided for submitting to police all the proof sheets of contents of papers before publication.

What was seditious news was to be determined by the police, and not by the judiciary.

Under this Act many of the papers were fined, their editors jailed.

The affected party could not seek redress in a court of law.

The fixed amount had to be paid for a security guarantee.

This law was not applicable to the English Press.

It was repealed by Lord Ripon in 1882.

 

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