Moist Tropical Evergreen Vegetation


These are the tropical rain forests which are further divided into two sub-types on the basis of their characteristics as under:

 

[1] The Wet Tropical Evergreen Vegetation 

These forests are found in the western slope of the Western Ghats, hills of the northeastern region and the Andaman and Nicobar Islands.

They are found in warm and humid areas with annual precipitation of over 200 cm and mean annual temperature above 22oC.

Southern parts of Western Ghat of Kerala and Karnataka are very wet.

It resembles the equatorial vegetation.

This type of vegetal cover has been badly depleted due to over cutting of trees.

There is no definite time for trees to shed their leaves, flowering and fruition.  As such these forests appear green all the year round.

These forests are dense and have lofty evergreen trees, often as high as 60 metres and above.

These forests are multilayered: shrubs cover the layer closer to the ground, followed by the short structured trees and then the tall variety.

The number of vegetal species per unit area is too large to exploit them commercially.

Species found in these forests include Rosewood, Mahogany, Aini, Ebony, Cinchona, Bamboos, Palms etc. The grass is almost absent.

The wood of these trees is very hard and heavy to work with.

 

[2] Moist Tropical Semi-evergreen Vegetation

It is found between wet evergreen vegetation and moist temperate deciduous vegetation.

Such forests have a mixture of evergreen and moist deciduous trees.

This type of vegetation is found on the Meghalaya plateau, Sahyadris, the eastern Himalayas and Andaman and Nicobar Islands.

The vegetation cover is less dense than the wet evergreen forests.

Timber of these forests is fine textured and of good quality.

Rosewood, aini and telsur are important trees in Sahyadris, Champa, Joon and Gurjan in Assam and Meghalaya and Ironwood, Ebony and Laurel grew in other regions.

Shifting agriculture and overexploitation of forests have depleted this vegetal cover to a great extent.